The Russians are screwing with the GPS system to send bogus navigation data to thousands of ships

The Russians are hacking the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) on a mass scale in order to confuse thousands of ships and airplanes about where they are, according to a study by Centre for Advanced Defense (C4ADS).
Law enforcement, shipping, airlines, power stations, your phone, and anything else dependent on GPS time and location synchronization, are vulnerable to GNSS hacking.
All of Britain’s critical infrastructure is dependent on GNSS and GPS, according to a report commissioned by the UK Space Agency.
Russian president Putin’s summer dacha is protected by a GNSS spoofing array that helps create a no-fly zone over his vast Italian-style mansion.
GNSS jamming equipment costs $300.
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On May 15, 2018, under a sunny sky, Russian President Vladimir Putin drove a bright orange truck in a convoy of construction vehicles for the opening of the Kerch Bridge from Russia to Crimea. At 11 miles long, it is now the longest bridge in either Europe or Russia.

As Putin drove across the bridge, something weird happened. The satellite navigation systems in the control rooms of more than 24 ships anchored nearby suddenly started displaying false information about their location. Their GPS systems told their captains they were anchored more than 65 kilometres away — on land, at the Anapa Airport.

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Author: Breaking News TV